Fallawater

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Also known as: Mountain Pippin, Green Mountain Pippin, Molly Whopper, Kelly, Fornwalder, Tulpehocken, Falder, Pound, Pim’s Beauty of the West, Walldower, Waldour, Pharawalder, Fallenwalder, Brubacker, Brubaker, Winter Blush, Benjamite, Baltimore, Pfarver, Mountain Green

An old apple originating in Bucks Co., Pennsylvania before 1842 which became widely popular throughout the South. In the South the tree grows well only at altitudes above 1,500 feet. Mountain-grown fruits ripen later in the season and keep longer in cold storage. Its sweet, mild flavor and attractive large size make this a good market variety. Fruit large to very large with dull green skin shaded with red and bronze. Flesh is greenish white, tender, coarse and juicy. Ripens late September to mid October and is a good keeper.

Fallawater Fruit
Fallawater Bloom

 

 

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  1. laura jane jarosz
    laura jane jarosz09-26-2015

    I would like to purchase a fallawater apple tree. How much does it cost? When to plant
    fall or springtime? please answer

    • Ron Joyner
      Ron Joyner09-29-2015

      Hi Laura,
      We have a couple of Fallawater trees still available for purchase and delivery this fall for $20 each plus S&H. Visit our website at http://bighorsecreekfarm.com/fall-varieties/ where you can view the current list of trees ready for delivery this season. For detailed information on how to submit an order go to http://bighorsecreekfarm.com/how-to-order/.

      We strongly suggest fall planting for the best results. The “trick” to successfully raising healthy apple trees is to concentrate on developing strong root systems. When you plant a fruit tree it will have a limited amount of stored energy reserves that, in the best situation, should go into developing strong, healthy roots. Since the fall-planted tree is dormant when put into the ground, it does not need to expend these limited energy reserves on developing top growth. By planting trees in the fall all the stored resources go solely into root development. Even during the dead of winter the tree will be actively developing roots in preparation for new spring growth. When spring arrives the tree will be well-prepared for uptake of water and soil nutrients. “Everything begins and ends with the roots!”

      Hope this will be of some help. Thanks for writing.

  2. laura jane jarosz
    laura jane jarosz09-26-2015

    comment: I would like to purchas a fallawater apple tree.
    Where and when do I plant the tree – fall or springtime.
    Please answer

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